Invisible Art
Now you see it, now you don't

Invisible Art

In the late 50's, French conceptual artist Yves Klein had a utopian vision of creating an architecture of air: walls, ceilings, furniture, would be made of air, and while these things would exist they wouldn't necessarily be visible. In the early 90's, Italian sculptor and performer Maurizio Cattelan claimed to the Italian police that an invisible sculpture had been stolen from his car. He was involved in a group show the following day and didn't have a piece to place in the exhibition. The police believed him, they did in fact write up a report, not second guessing his claim of theft and the report was entered into the show as the work of art. Andy Warhol stood on a pedestal and the work was his presence.  These are a few examples of A Brief History of Invisible Art. Curator Ralph Rugoff explores the interactive and communicative properties of this arm of the conceptual art movement.