Shopdropping
An Intervention into Consumerism

Shopdropping

As time passes and companies merge, corporations are growing. Individuality is lost, creativity is set aside, and the worlds of art and corporation become all the more disparate. Pond, a collective gallery space in San Francisco, wanted to address this issue and look at the world of intervention art, art that interrupts consumer spaces forcing you to stop and think about that space, and what you’re buying. The show was called Shopdropping. The way it works is this: An artist makes a piece, say in the case of Packard Jennings, a doll. But as an interrupt, the doll is not necessarily one they sell. He made a Mussolini doll and shopdropped it into a store. When he went to buy the doll, they needed a price check on “Mussolini”. Shopdropping uses beauty, humor and intimacy to invite shoppers to take a moment to reflect upon their consumerism, and in so doing, present alternatives to accepted and traditional systems of exchange creating alternate economic regimes.